Tag Archives: Panic

Printers – Scum of the Earth

26 Mar

I hate printers! Despise the buggers. Within the last week alone I’ve had issues with more than one of the bloody things. First off, trying to use the library printers to print something in colour, first it was in colour, but double sided( which isn’t aloud when handing work in) then it was black and white not double sided, then black and white double sided and finally I managed to get it right. Cost me a bomb in printer credit, and considering I’m low on money that was shitter.  And just today I tired printing off a job application and my CV and my own printers buggered. It keeps shouting at me that there’s a cartridge jam. There isn’t!

It seems like this post is going to be a bit of a rant post. Well a lot of a rant post really.

  • I can’t find my holdall to pack my stuff (I’m heading home at the end of the week.)
  • I’m short on boxes to use because I can’t find my hold all.
  • I need to get an essay done in the next two days, or at least the majority of it and all of the library work, and my work ethic at the moment is less than zilch.
  • I need to use the bloody printers again. Stupid bloody things.
  • Hypocrites all around at the moment too.
  • And selfishness, can’t stand it.
  • I’m going to have to spend my last couple of quid on printer credits because of that faff with the printers the other day.
  • And finally last night I whacked my leg on the heater and have a massive bruise.

</rant>

I’m right in the mood for a row. A right slinging match!

I’m going to go calm down now.

-C

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If I got any busier, I’d be the M1 at rush hour.

21 Mar

Chopstick here!

Honest to God, if I do any more stuff, I’m at risk of expiring. Let me give you a run-down of why there’s a frown in Becki Town:

  • The Lincoln Award – Chunks and I recently signed up to do the LA, an award which asks students to do 40+ hours of volunteering or part-time work, as well as joining workshops and undertaking training (like St. John’s Ambulance or sign-language lessons, both of which we’re interested in). That, straight away, asks us to do a lot of extra work on top of our university stuff.
  • Deadlines – I’ve got a few bits of work coming up, so I’m in the process of writing essays at the minute. They’re all fairly inaccessible  based on specialist reporting in the media and on the dislocations of society in literature. Hmm.
  • Library – (see above reasons) I’ve spent around 50-70 hours in the library this semester. Frankly, that is an unnecessary amount of bookishness.
  • Training – Because I’m looking into doing a PGCE (Post-Graduate Certificate of Education) following the completion of my second year, I’ve been doing quite a lot of extra stuff in order to make me look like a more rounded individual. This includes some extra training for:
  1. My current job with Clear Links. I work as a transcription facilitator (or note-taker, for the uninitiated) with people with disabilities, and I recently attended a training session to see whether  I have the capacity to be an examination facilitator – I essentially take notes in lectures!
  2. My new volunteering position. I recently applied to Urban Times for an editor position, ad was given a phone interview the other day on how to write for the site. One of my articles has since been published and even made it to the front page. For a read about press freedom, click here.
This is me at the minute... Full of traffic. (source: Highways Agency / Flickr)

This is me at the minute… Full of traffic. (source: Highways Agency / Flickr)

There’s seems to be little and less time in the day for relaxing, but the fact I can write a blog today suggests that things are beginning to slow up which is particularly good news. Hopefully, I’ll come to you next Thursday with a more interesting, less listy blog for you to read.

 

Take care, CS. x

Aside

Live in Pride with our Survival Guide – Part 4: Getting your shit done

19 Mar

Good start on the ‘blogging on certain days of the week’ thing. I’d totally forgot that I’d been nominated for Tuesdays and I don’t have anything prepared. So going off the survival guide theme we’ve had in the past few weeks and as deadline time is fast approaching I’ll write a continuation.

How to get through deadline time

1. Don’t leave it until the last minute – You’d think that this was an obvious one, but a fair portion of the people I know do just that. (*Cough cough* Benson There’s a deadline for our creative portfolio module on Friday and Chopstick is currently sat in the library coaching him through getting it done.) You need to get the work done as soon as possible, or at least the bulk of the prep work and plans. It just makes it so much easier when you come to write it.

2. Decide on a topic or question and stick with it – Don’t go changing your question half way through, or even worse just before the deadline, again I know people who have done this and then they panic when they’re still writing an hour before deadline cut off and then are rushing to get to the office to get in it.

3. Actually go to the lectures/seminars – They help. Not only do you get straight up information from the lectures, in seminars you get discussion from not only the teacher, but the other students too. These discussions are really good for getting different interpretations and totally new points you’ve not thought of and that you can discuss in the essay, giving you much more scope.

4. Find a place where you can actually work – Some people work better at home, others outside, and some work better in the library. Personally I work better in the library, less distractions. The xbox isn’t there for a start, there’s no TV, you can watch Youtube and what have you in ours I suppose, but still there are less distractions.

5. Use resources – There’ll be a library at the university. Use it. Our university – if not all – have online resources too, which means you can access journals and whatnot at home. if you’re one of those who works better in comfort. Online recourse’s are particularly good as you have the CTRL+F function where you can search for a certain word without having to faff wading through everything. Plus, take a look at this infographic on how to use google search effectively.

So, that’s my contribution for this week.

Good luck to all those suffering with Deadlines at the moment too.

-C

 

End of the blogging frenzy

16 Mar

It seems last week was a flurry of blogging for us! This week however, things have simmered down a bit for us. Once again,we’re stuck in the library getting work done. I’ve just printed a load of work for my creative portfolio, and Chopstick is writing a article to go in for editing so that it can then appear on Urban Times. So we’ve not had all that much time to get anything else done. However, in one of our small breaks from work we’ve decided to set specific dates for when we post a blog, so that we keep the content updated and don’t end up relying of Sunday guest posts. Tuesdays and Thursdays have been voted in as the winners. I imagine there will be other posts in between those too to be honest.

I’m afraid this is just a short update post, once deadlines are over, we’ll probably be back to regular broadcasting. I needs to get on with another essay now. Laters

-C

Guest Post: Introducing… BROWS

10 Mar

Hey guys, Brows here (and if you think that nickname’s odd, you should know they used to call me Miles for my apparent resemblance to Miley Cyrus)! I was asked to write a blog post for the ever-witty ‘Chopstick and Chunks’, so I thought I’d write about something that plagues a great many of students and young adults – finance.

I’ll take that £2.27 – That would buy me a pint!

From a student perspective, it’s easy to run out of money. Whether it’s rash spending (I’m a beggar for buying books and alcohol – an odd combination, perhaps, but that’s English Literature students for you!) or those pesky nights out that start with a sensible ‘I’ll just have one or two’, and escalates to buying everyone in the bar a sodding drink. Even if you’re the most sensible student on earth, accidents happen, and you’ll more than likely end up broke and living on 15p noodles at some point.

Prevention is kind of obvious – cutting back on the booze, getting a decent shop in when your money first comes in, crap like that – but that’s not going to help when your money’s already gone. So, I thought I’d put together some tips for what happens when you hit panic mode.

1)      DVDs and GAMES. Have a large collection? Selling your DVDs is an easy way to make cash when you’re broke. Places like CEX are excellent for this, especially since you can check on their website how much they’ll buy them for. Just ask yourself – does my flatmate have this DVD? Do I really need it? Can I watch it online instead? Depends how cautious you are on the last one, I guess! But a small stack can make you a pretty penny if you need it – and you can always buy it back later. Games tend to fetch more if they’re recent, so it’s always worth considering.

2)      BOOKS. Got a ridiculous sized text book from your first year, or something relevant to student studies? Most universities hold book sales in their on-campus libraries. I know with the two universities I have been to, you handed your books in along with how much you wanted to sell them for. At my last uni, if they weren’t sold you got them back – bonus, since if all else fails you can flog it on eBay. Ever had a book that cost forty-odd quid? Think how many students will want it if you sell it for £20. Even if your uni doesn’t run one, it’s not hard to club together with mates to hold your own, and there are shops that will buy off you. It’s worth checking for a local buy-and-sell Facebook group, too – or Gumtree.com if you can’t find one. I’ve made a pretty penny both ways.

We need a banana for scale here.

3)      CLOTHES. These can be a bit harder to sell unless you go on eBay. While worth it, eBay can be a bit of a hassle, so it’s worth having a nose around your local town or city. Most places will have boutiques that take in your clothes to sell on, and pay you a percentage of the profit once they’re sold (usually around 60%, which isn’t bad). Handy if you’ve got a nice jacket you’ve outgrown, or something new and unworn that your grandma sent you and you hate. Not the most instant way to make cash, but if you hit the fashion trend, you’re gold. A lot of small retro/vintage boutiques have sprung up that specialise in this, and since vintage seems to be the in thing of late, you can make a killing. It’s worth tapping into Google, too, since there are a few online places for this – something I know my sibling uses for survival!

4)      BRITISH HEART FOUNDATION. Now, this is up to your individual conscience for this one. If you have a British Heart Foundation charity shop nearby, it’s worth signing up for a donation card. Costs nothing, it just means that with it, the BHF earns more from selling donations. What it also means, however, is that your details are one file. So if you have clothes or books you can’t sell elsewhere, donate to them, and a little while later, you’ll get a letter through the post. This letter will tell you how much profit was made, and tells you to get in contact if you want all or part of that money. Pretty nice of them, huh? I personally couldn’t do it and let them have it, but it’s good to know that it’s there if you’re desperate.

Bart tells another incredibly amusing fart joke as Lisa plays air guitar.

5)      ACCOMODATION POSTERS. You may have noticed that electrical devices are really frickin’ hard to sell – charity shops and the like don’t take them, and very few people will buy a spare toaster off eBay.  It’s worth advertising in your student halls, if you live there. I recently sold my printer using that method. However, here’s an important tip: if you’re advertising by poster, DO NOT put your number on it. You’ll get pranked the hell out of, I guarantee it. Instead try your email address. Much safer. Of course, when it comes to phones/game consoles/music devices, it’s worth trying places like CEX first. But if it’s not going to earn you much, this method is handy for spendaholic students passing by (much like ourselves!). Try the communal areas for this.

6)      RUMMAGE! My last proper tip is to look through your old baggage. Do you have stuff left at your parent/family’s house? If you’re anything like me and my mates, you probably still have a good few boxes of stuff hiding under your old bed. Have a think about this. If it’s not in your flat, then do you need it? Are you missing it? I tend to find it’s mostly CDs, since they’re all burned onto your laptop anyway. These are best flogged on eBay for £2-3. Sounds cheap, but if you think – sell five and you have a tenner. Sell ten and you have £20. Beautiful! But yeah, if you’re not using it, chances are you don’t need it. So next time you visit your mum, have a poke through it.

There! These are the tips I’ve used to minimize my own damage. Prevention is better, but mishaps happen to the best of us. Sell your rubbish, buy the cheapest stuff, and you’ll be financially healthy in no time. And try to limit those mad nights out, eh?

All the best,
Mr. Brows.

Live in Pride with our Survival Guide! – Part 2: Freshers Week.

6 Mar

Okay, so you’ve arrived at Uni, you’ve somehow managed to fit all of your crap from home into the car and then get it all set up in your new room. Now, it’s time to get the ball rolling, so here’s some tips for your Freshers week.

To do:

  • Meet and get to know your House/Flat mates – These are the people that you are likely to hang around with for the most part of the first few months. Plus you’ll be living with them for at least a year, so it’s good to get to know them anyway. 
  • Claim your kitchen space – Depending on the type of accommodation you have you may have a shared kitchen so you’ll want to get in there first and ‘bagsy’ a decent cupboard, I’ve learnt this one through experience. This year I was the last to arrive and ended up getting the cupboards under the sink, and I know Chopstick was also give the shitty cupboards in her house too, in the little alcove with a sloping roof and the ice cube tray for her freezer space. It’s not fun.

One shelf per person usually works out best

  • Have a wander around – It’s likely that you’ve come to a new place in order to go to Uni, so having the foresight to get to know where things are is a good idea. Look for the nearest corner shop, offy, supermarket, the town center, library, park (or somewhere to chill for a while), find out how far away you are from Uni so that you’re not late on your first day – again I learnt this one through experience. 
  • Find course mates – If possible find at least one person who is on your course, or on a joint with your course, this one just gives you a heads up on going to seminars and lectures, it’s a lot less daunting when you know someone and can get lost on the first day together.
  • Try to find your Freshers Week timetable – If you’re Uni has a Freshers Week set of lectures (I assume most do) find out when and where they are as soon as possible, and for gods sake go to them! The are extremely useful, you may think them pointless, but they do help. Even if it’s only to help you find course mates.  Anecdote: With one of my Freshers Lec’s we were meant to split off into groups based upon or region, fair enough. Well it would have been if I wasn’t trapped within the middle of the row and couldn’t get out, so naturally I missed the window to go with the North West and ended up just following a random group which turned out to be the East Midlands room. So I couldn’t really contribute all that well. The upside of being a complete twat is that Chopstick was one also and ended up doing the same thing. Thus a friendship was formed. 

Not mine, but you get the gist.

  • Sort out course books – If you haven’t already got ahead with this one, try and find reading lists and get your books ordered, you don’t necessarily have to start reading them Freshers week, I imagine you’d be in one of two states all that week – drunk or hanging – neither conducive to study. But you’ll need to be at least somewhat ahead of the game.
  • Ground Rules – Without sounding like an arse hole try and set some ground rules for communal spaces. If you don’t get this sorted early on people will start to take liberties. A good example here is washing up once you’ve finished cooking, you don’t want mushrooms growing on things and the sides being covered in toast crumbs – been there done that.

Mine never got this bad – but it was close.

So that’s Freshers in the day time – Freshers After Dark is on it’s way.

Laters! C.

Live in Pride with our Survival Guide! – Part 1: What to bring?

5 Mar

Chopstick here!

Recently, we had a friend come to Lincoln for the day as he’s due to start university here with us next year. We were discussing things that, as a new university student, you should be aware of. There are so many things to list that it actually became impossible to keep track of all the things that were going on. As a result, we’re going to post a few lists over the next couple of days which – if you’re planning on going to university this year – you should really keep in mind.

This will be you in your first university week!

To bring:

  •  Spare bedding – Blankets, duvets, pillows and under-sheets. If you get wasted during Freshers and you vomit all over your only set of sheets, you will not be a happy bunny.
  • Tin openers – Some houses supply them, some don’t. However, if you intend to buy cheap foods, many of the cans don’t have ring-pulls – thus, need for tin opener. Beware!
  • Wet wipes – What if your shower packs up working? What if you need  to get clean quick but don’t have time to shower? What if you’re getting intimate and need a quick wash? All these ‘what if’s can be solved with a wet wipe.
  • All your important documents – when you first enroll into university, chances are you’re going to need some key documents. Include your birth certificate, a bank statement from the last three months and all your housing documentation. You may not want it, but you’ll probably need it. When travelling to university, it would also be wise to bring it up in the car with you!
  • Stationary – During the first week of uni, all of the good stuff gets snapped up. Get it early!
  • Stamps – They sound like an unnecessary thing, but they last forever and sending off forms becomes vastly easier when you have stamps to hand.
  • Food – Fresher’s Week wipes out the supermarkets and clogs up the roads, so you aren’t going to want to go shopping for a tonne of food when you’ve spent all day unpacking. At the least, bring pasta, bread, milk and butter.
  • Alcohol – It can be awkward meeting new people for the first time. As soon as you start drinking, you don’t need to worry about awkwardness.
  • Basic tools – This can range from person to person, but I’ve found bringing an Allan key, a flat-headed screw driver, Blutak, lightbulbs and sellotape to be the most effective kit.
  • Washing-up liquid and toilet roll – Many houses share these products, but you can’t be presumptuous; strangers might not want to share their necessities.

There are so many things people use to bring to university with them that they consider an essential, it’s difficult to compile an accurate list! For more information – or a To Do List – for when you get there, read Chunk’s post here.

WHAT DID YOU BRING?

Take care! CS. c